Tag Archives: new grad

Nursing school supplies you never knew you needed

nursing school supplies

If you’re a nursing student (or about to be), you already know that you need a stethoscope, tons of pens and highlighters and a reliable alarm clock. But here are a few nursing school supplies you may not even know you need (but you’ll absolutely LOVE life more if you have them!)

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Hyponatremia: Podcast Episode 17

Hyponatremia

In this podcast episode we talk about the basics of hyponatremia:

  • What is hyponatremia?
  • Common causes including neuro injury, psych disorder, even just plain ol’ poor judgment
  • The signs/symptoms of hyponatremia
  • How you treat it a

As usual, this podcast and blog are not intended to replace current evidence-based practice or your institutions policies and procedures. It is intended for educational purposes only.

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The most common types of difficult patients and families…and how to deal

difficult patients

Are you heading into your 4th semester preceptorship, or perhaps you’re a new grad getting ready to start out on your own. By now you’ve seen a glimpse of some of the types of difficult patients/families that the RNs have had to deal with. Sometimes the challenge is subtle and easily handled…like the patient with 10 family members who all call for separate updates (that one’s easy…designate ONE spokespserson), or it could be more overt with hostile, aggressive behavior that makes you question the continuity of your own personal safety.

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Blood thinners – what you need to know

blood thinners

Blood clots are a serious business. They can restrict or even completely block blood flow to organs and extremities, causing things like pulmonary embolism, heart attack, stroke, ischemic bowel and even loss of limbs. So, it makes perfect sense that we want to prevent blood clots AND treat them when they occur. How do we do this?

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Dealing with difficult docs using SBAR

SBAR

Before I start an “us” vs. “them” war, let me start off by saying that I cannot imagine the pressure that physicians are under these days. They go for long stretches with no days off, work very long hours, have tremendous responsibility and, basically, have a job that I would never ever ever want. So, with that said, it is understandable that you will, at times, deal with a difficult or demanding physician. These tips about SBAR and effective communication should help!

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Managing intracranial pressure (ICP)

ICP

Taking care of patients with neurological injury means managing their intracranial pressure, or as it’s commonly called, ICP. And when we say neurological injury, keep in mind that we’re not just talking about people getting bonked on the head with a 2 x 4. We’re talking about space-occupying lesions, hydrocephalus, intracranial hemorrhage, subdural/epidural hematoma, even severe hyponatremia…basically anything that’s a key player in (drum roll please….) the Monro-Kellie doctrine.

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Surviving Night Shift

Night Shift

If you’re like me, your 4th semester preceptorship is on night shift and you have no idea how you are going to survive. Even if you snagged a fabulous day shift precept spot, chances are you’ll be a night shift nurse as a new-grad anyway….and knowing how to survive could mean the difference between loving your job and absolutely dreading it. With these tips, you’ll be rocking night shift like a pro!

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Idiot-Proof your Patient

One of the most useful skills you will utilize as an RN is organization. In fact, if assessment is your King-Daddy skill, then organization is a close second. An organized, orderly room is a much safer (and more pleasant) place to be than a chaotic mess. One of the things I like to do is something I call “idiot-proofing” my patient. This has nothing to do with the intellectual capacity of my patient, but more to do with setting things up so that anyone (ANYONE) could walk into my room and know what’s what. Here are a few things I do to make sure that if someone walked into my room while I was away, they would know what they need to know:

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