Tag Archives: clinicals

PodQuiz Pediatric Nursing Part 1: Episode 14

Pediatric nursing

In this PodQuiz we cover three very common pediatric nursing topics!

  • Peds nutrition (how many calories in an ounce of breast milk?)
  • Peds assessment (at what age can you assess a radial pulse?)
  • Peds psychosocial (how do you help a school-age child adapt to hospitalization?)

What’s a PodQuiz? It’s essentially flashcards for your ears! Nurse Mo asks a question, pauses while you answer, then states the answer…it’s a fantastic way to study while you’re on the go, exercising, commuting, folding laundry, making dinner, feeding the baby, getting your nails done….you get the idea.

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Blood thinners – what you need to know

blood thinners

Blood clots are a serious business. They can restrict or even completely block blood flow to organs and extremities, causing things like pulmonary embolism, heart attack, stroke, ischemic bowel and even loss of limbs. So, it makes perfect sense that we want to prevent blood clots AND treat them when they occur. How do we do this?

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Liver Failure Basics: Podcast Episode 11

liver failure

In this episode, we go through the basics of liver failure using my ingenious, wonderful, amazing LATTE method, which breaks down any patient condition into the “need to know” info.

  • L = How will the patient LOOK?
  • A = How will you ASSESS the patient?
  • T = What TESTS will be ordered?
  • T = What TREATMENTS will be provided?
  • E = How do you EDUCATE the patient/family?

Amazing, right? For more resources, visit www.straightanursingstudent.com. For LATTE resource sheets, look under “resources” in the top nav bar. Enjoy!

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PodQuiz Fundamentals 2: Episode 10

Nursing Fundamentals

Think you know your nursing fundamentals? Listen to this PodQuiz and find out!  In this episode, we cover:

  • Bowel elimination
  • Ostomies
  • Enemas
  • Occult blood and pH testing
  • Urinalysis
  • Latex allergies
  • Sterile field

What’s a PodQuiz? It’s essentially flashcards for your ears! Nurse Mo asks a question, pauses while you answer, then states the answer…it’s a fantastic way to study while you’re on the go, exercising, commuting, folding laundry, making dinner, feeding the baby, getting your nails done….you get the idea.

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Clinical calculations

clinical calculations

As an RN, you’ll find that you need these four basic calculations almost every single shift you work. In this post we’ll cover what they are and why they matter.

Anion Gap

The anion gap will usually come into play when you are taking care of a patient in diabetic ketoacidosis. However, to be totally accurate, it is actually used to alert us that the patient is in ANY kind of metabolic acidosis and can even help us differentiate what caused it.

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Podcast Episode 5: ICP Management

ICP MANAGEMENT

Managing ICP (intracranial pressure) is a complex balancing act. In this podcast you’ll learn the basics of ICP monitoring and management, what to watch for, when to intervene and HOW to intervene.

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Podcast Episode 3: ARDS

ARDS

In this episode we talk about the basics of ARDS – Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. It is the most severe form of acute lung injury and is something we see pretty regularly in the MICU. Learn about the different stages that occur as ARDS develops, what you’re going to assess and how the patient is going to be treated in this episode of the Straight A Nursing Podcast.

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Day shift vs night shift…which is for you?

night shift

As someone who’s about to finish up on night shift and start back on day shift , I thought it might be fun to compare the pros and cons of each shift. Each definitely has its merits, so if you’re not sure which shift is for you…read on! I’ve worked both days and nights, and I can definitely say each shift has its advantages AND disadvantages. The difference is….well…night and day!

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Podcast: Diabetes

DKA

Hands-down, diabetes is probably THE most common comorbidity you’ll see in the hospital setting. Understanding the two “big daddy” diabetes complications should help you take care of these very sick patients. DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis) and HHS (hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome) are deadly serious conditions that require a diligent RN and a solid grasp of the pathophysiology and treatment plans.

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