Mailbag Monday: admission requirements

admission nursing school

Nursing school admission requirements can be confusing, and it’s even worse when you can’t find the guidance you need.

I recently stumbled upon your website for my anatomy and physiology class and have told my classmates about it. I do have a question though in regards to getting into nursing school. I have tried to talk to my academic advisors about my concerns, but they haven’t been exactly helpful. I am finishing up my last 3 classes before I am able to apply for nursing school. Do you know if nursing schools look down upon students who have taken classes over for a better grade? Also, I should graduate with a 3.4 GPA (I also have been working almost full time and I’m a single mom). Do the schools take into account these things while going through applicants? Thanks so much for your time! -Heather

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Podcast Episode 3: ARDS

ARDS

In this episode we talk about the basics of ARDS – Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. It is the most severe form of acute lung injury and is something we see pretty regularly in the MICU. Learn about the different stages that occur as ARDS develops, what you’re going to assess and how the patient is going to be treated in this episode of the Straight A Nursing Podcast.

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Day shift vs night shift…which is for you?

night shift

As someone who’s about to finish up on night shift and start back on day shift , I thought it might be fun to compare the pros and cons of each shift. Each definitely has its merits, so if you’re not sure which shift is for you…read on! I’ve worked both days and nights, and I can definitely say each shift has its advantages AND disadvantages. The difference is….well…night and day!

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Podcast: Diabetes

DKA

Hands-down, diabetes is probably THE most common comorbidity you’ll see in the hospital setting. Understanding the two “big daddy” diabetes complications should help you take care of these very sick patients. DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis) and HHS (hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome) are deadly serious conditions that require a diligent RN and a solid grasp of the pathophysiology and treatment plans.

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Emergency or Not?

emergency nursing

As a student nurse or even a brand new nurse, you may find that you are often perplexed if the situation your patient is facing is an actual emergency or not. In this episode we cover some basic scenarios that need to be evaluated quickly so that you can intervene appropriately and swiftly.

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ECMO: hardcore support for the lungs & heart

ECMO

ECMO (otherwise known as extracorporeal membraneous oxygenation) is essentially a life support measure used when the lungs or both heart and lungs cannot function adequately with traditional mechanical ventilation support.  In ECMO, blood is drained from the body, diverted to an oxygenator where gas exchange takes place, then returned to the patient. There! Now you know everything you need to know about ECMO. Just kidding! Let’s start at the very beginning.

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Trauma nursing case study

trauma nursing

It’s your first shift of four-in-a-row and little do you know that you are in for a tough stretch! Your shift starts out calmly enough, but at 0200 you take report on a 23-yr old post-surgical trauma patient who came in through the ED due to a pedestrian vs auto incident. The patient was crossing the road on a dark, rainy night when she was struck by a vehicle at approximately 30 mph. Her injuries are:

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Dealing with difficult docs using SBAR

SBAR

Before I start an “us” vs. “them” war, let me start off by saying that I cannot imagine the pressure that physicians are under these days. They go for long stretches with no days off, work very long hours, have tremendous responsibility and, basically, have a job that I would never ever ever want. So, with that said, it is understandable that you will, at times, deal with a difficult or demanding physician. These tips about SBAR and effective communication should help!

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Managing intracranial pressure (ICP)

ICP

Taking care of patients with neurological injury means managing their intracranial pressure, or as it’s commonly called, ICP. And when we say neurological injury, keep in mind that we’re not just talking about people getting bonked on the head with a 2 x 4. We’re talking about space-occupying lesions, hydrocephalus, intracranial hemorrhage, subdural/epidural hematoma, even severe hyponatremia…basically anything that’s a key player in (drum roll please….) the Monro-Kellie doctrine.

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Even better nursing school notes for YOU!

nursing school notes

Cover page….so pretty!

I am SO EXCITED and wanted to share with you all something I’ve been working on tirelessly for months and months! I am in the process of upgrading ALL of the nursing school notes into works of art. No seriously…they are fabulous!

I will SOON have all of Med/Surg I complete and then I’ll dive into Med/Surg II, then Peds, OB and Mental Health. I can’t wait…can you???

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