Staying healthy in nursing school

Healthy in Nursing School

Nursing school can very easily take over every aspect of your life, just like it did mine. The whole reason I started this website was to keep other students from falling into that trap by providing resources to make nursing school more manageable. In the five years it took me to take all my prerequisites and get through my program, I watched my health slowly deteriorate until I ended up diagnosed with a chronic illness that could have either killed or seriously debilitated me at any time (if you’re into that sort of thing, you can read about it here).

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Nursing school time management tips

nursing school time management

Nursing school time management is one of the biggest hurdles you will have to conquer. Time and time again nursing students lament their out-of-control schedules, late night study sessions, lack of sleep and vanishing social lives. But, with a solid time-management strategy, you can be the boss of your schedule, get to bed on time and still see your family and friends. Here’s how you do it.

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‘Twas the night before clinical: Episode 34

clinical

Since it’s the holidays, let’s all take a break from studying, shall we? Enjoy a sweet little Christmas tale, relax with your family and friends, eat too many cookies, wear too many pajamas and feel joy in whatever way makes your heart sing. We’ll be back to studying again in 2018 with many, many exciting things in store INCLUDING:

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The nose of a nurse: dealing with bad smells in the hospital

bad smells hospital

In the clinical setting, nurses come across all manner of sights, sounds, and yes…smells. But beyond the obvious ones that people complain about (which I never understand…you DID know what you were getting into, right?), certain smells can tell you a thing or two about your patient’s health. In this post we’ve compiled a list of a few disease states that come with a special odor all their own. So, while bad smells in the hospital probably aren’t your favorite part of your job, there are times when they can come in handy. Don’t worry…we’ll get to how to handle them in a minute!

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What the heck is the P/F Ratio: Episode 33

PF ratio

In this podcast we talk about one of the MOST useful and EASIEST, QUICKEST calculations you can do to determine just how sick your respiratory-compromised patient is…the PF ratio! Check out some of the amazing things you’ll learn:

  • What the P and F stand for; what is PaO2 and what is FiO2?
  • Difference between PaO2 and SaO2
  • Optimal PaO2 ranges and levels of hypoxemia
  • How to calculate the PF ratio and what the heck it means
  • What the numbers tell us and how it applies to the overall clinical picture

For more information on ARDS, check out this post, this awesome podcast episode or this SUPER awesome reference sheet. (if your podcast platform does not support links, please visit the website for total linkage at www.straightanursingstudent.com)

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Focus on Pharm: Haloperidol (Haldol)

haldol

The last time I gave Haldol I was in a room with five other nurses trying to get an extremely agitated patient to calm down before he became a serious danger to himself and my colleagues. This particular patient had come up from the emergency room in full drug-induced psychosis related to methamphetamine use. He was in four-point restraints and STILL required an entire gaggle of RNs to keep him (and ourselves) safe.

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Ventilator weaning starts at intubation: Episode 32

ventilator weaning

In this episode of the Straight A Nursing podcast, we talk about ventilator weaning, which is actually a process that starts the moment the patient is intubated. If you are entering your advanced Med/Surg clinical rotation or are new to the ICU, this podcast will provide you with the basic knowledge you need to advocate for your patient and help guide them toward extubation.

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Trauma case study: Episode 31

trauma case study

As I’ve said many times before, nursing is all about solving problems. You SEE something, you DO something…it’s so simple. But, at the same time, putting it into practice can be quite complex. The patient problems you start out with at the beginning of your shift, are not always going to be the same problems you’re dealing with a few hours in. As a nurse, your ability to adapt, reprioritize and reevaluate is the MOST ESSENTIAL thing you can do.

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